Contributors' Notes

 

Theodore W. Allen is an independent scholar living in New York and the author of The Invention of the White Race, 2 Volumes (Verso).

Zoë Anglesey, editor of Listen Up! Spoken Word Poetry, has poems in recent issues of Mantis, Rattapallax, Brilliant Corners, The Seattle Review, Rattle and Clockpunchers: Poetry of America's Workplace. Recent translations appear in Mantis and Bomb Magazine. Forthcoming are Gazelle Legato (poems) and Xumáco: New and Selected Translations from the Americas. She teaches as an adjunct professor at Medgar Evers College and the New School University in New York.

Jamie Owen Daniel teaches in the English Department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has been president of the Marxist Literary Group since 1997 and is an Executive Board member of Chicago Jobs with Justice. She is the co-translator of Negt and Kluge's Public Sphere and Experience, and has written extensively on public and counter-public sphere theory, public housing and the re-bourgeoisification of urban space, academic organizing and labor movement, and on class and subjectivity.

Teresa L. Ebert has written Ludic Feminism and After: Postmodernism, Desire and Labor in Late Capitalism (University of Michigan Press) and Culture and Its Other: Sexuality, Class and the Flaneur (forthcoming). Her cybertext, "Quango-ing the University: The Ends of Critique-al Humanities" is in Cultural Logic 1.1 <http://eserver.org/clogic/1-1/ebert.html>.

Haidar Eid received a Ph.D. in 2000 from Rand Afrikaans University-Johannesburg, South Africa. He has been a senior lecturer at Vista University in Soweto, and at the moment he is working as an assistant professor of English at Al-Quds Open University in Gaza.

John Bellamy Foster teaches sociology at the University of Oregon and is the author of many works, including, most recently, Marx's Ecology.

Anthony Jarells is a graduate student at the State University of New York-Stony Brook and is finishing his dissertation on violence and literature in eighteenth-century British literature.

Richard E. Joines is completing his dissertation, "For Those with Ears to Hear: Emerson, Rhetoric, and Political Philosophy," at the University of Florida where he teaches composition, American literature, and creative writing. His essay "Emerson's Proleptic Eloquence" appeared in Nineteenth-Century Prose (Fall 2000), and his review of Geoff Waite's Nietzsche's Corps/e will appear in Rethinking Marxism. He also writes about Philip K. Dick, Don DeLillo, and American and British poetry.

Andrew Kurtz is Assistant Professor of English at Bowling Green State University, Firelands College. He is currently working on a number of articles investigating the relationship between hegemony, technology, and emergent subjectivities, including pieces on first-person computer games and the fiction of Alice Sheldon.

Chris Lamb, Ph.D., who teaches Media Studies at the College of Charleston, in Charleston, SC., is writing a book on baseball's first integrated spring training.

Neil Larsen is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Classics at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of Modernism and Hegemony (1990), Reading North by South (1995) and Nations, Narratives, History: Problems of Theory and the "Postcolonial" (forthcoming). nalarsen@green.ucdavis.edu

Tom Lewis Tom Lewis teaches Spanish literature and culture at the University of Iowa. He has written widely on marxism and on topics in the philosophy of language and literary criticism.

Sophia A. McClennen teaches in the Foreign Languages Dept. and Women's Studies at Illinois State University. Her courses and research are based on cultural studies, media studies and gender studies, with special attention to comparative methods. She is the founder of Cinergía a web site dedicated to promoting media literacy and the study of Spanish, Latin American and Latino Film at http://lilt.ilstu.edu/smexpos/cinergia/Cinergia.htm. Her homepage: http://lilt.ilstu.edu/smexpos/ and her e-mail: smexpos@ilstu.edu.

Gregory Meyerson teaches at North Carolina State University. He is currently completing a book called The Difference Class Makes: Marxism, Moral Realism and Anti-Racism.

Satya P. Mohanty was born in Cuttack, Orissa. He was educated both in India and in the United States, and is currently Professor of English at Cornell University.

Colin Mooers teaches in the Politics Department and the Graduate Program in Communication and Culture at Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada. He is the author of The Making of Bourgeois Europe: Absolutism, Revolution and the Rise of Capitalism in England, France and Germany (Verso 1991) and was recently a contributing co-editor of Restructuring and Resistance: Canadian Public Policy in an Age of Global Capitalism (Fernwood 2000). He can be reached at cmooers@ryerson.ca.

Paula M. L. Moya is Assistant Professor of English at Stanford University, where she teaches courses in American literature, US Latina/o and Chicana/o literature, and minority and feminist theoretical perspectives. Recent publications include the co-edited anthology (with Michael Hames-García) Reclaiming Identity: Realist Theory and the Predicament of Postmodernism (UC Press, 2000), and an essay entitled "Chicana Feminism and Postmodernist Theory" in Signs. (Winter 2001). Her book, Learning from Experience: Minority Identities, Multicultural Struggles is forthcoming from the University of California Press in Fall 2001.

Ronaldo Munck is currently Chair of Political Sociology at the University of Liverpool, having previously worked and been active in South Africa and Ireland. He has written widely on labour and development issues, with his forthcoming Labour and Globalisation: The Second Great Transformation coming out with Zed Books. His Globalisation and Democracy website is at <www.globdem.org.uk> and he is active in setting up the Global Studies Association. E-mail address: oisin@liv.ac.uk.

Norman J. Olson is a 52-year-old small press poet and artist. Since publishing his first poem in 1984, after 17 year of continuous rejection, he has published over 100 poems in 72 different literary magazines as well as 47 drawings, 22 essays, and 5 short stories. His work has appeared in cutting edge, punk publications like Warhead and Face of the Assassin as well as in literary magazines such as Atom, Mind, Icon, The Wisconsin Academy Review, The Maryland Review, and many more.

William O'Meara is Professor of Philosophy at James Madison University. He has also published on Marx: "Mead and Marx on the Social Nature of Rationality and Freedom," Frontiers in American Philosophy, Vol. I, ed. Burch and Saatkamp (College Station: Texas A & M University Press, 1992) pp. 253-263, and "The Social Nature of Self and Morality for Husserl, Schutz, Marx, and Mead," Philosophy Research Archives, 1987, pp. 329-355.

Kelly Rusinack wrote her master's thesis at Clemson University on the Daily Worker's campaign to integrate baseball. She lives in Baltimore.

Susanne Soederberg is an Assistant Professor in International Political Economy at the Department of Political Science, University of Alberta, Canada. Her current research areas include: the political economy of the emerging FTAA, the political economy of international financial markets and their relationship to the Southern hemisphere, especially, Mexico, Chile, the Philippines and Thailand.

Michael Sprinker taught at the State University of New York at Stony Brook until his death in 1999. He was the author of Imaginary Relations: Aesthetics and Ideology in the Theory of Historical Materialism and History and Ideology in Proust, among many other works.

Alan Wald, who teaches at the University of Michigan, is an editor of Against the Grain and the author of many essays and books about the American Left.

Mike Wayne teaches Film and Television studies at Brunel University, UK. His forthcoming book is entitled Political Film: The Dialectics of Third Cinema (Pluto Press, 2001).

 

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Cultural Logic, ISSN 1097-3087, Volume 3, Numbers 1 and 2, Fall, 1999, and Spring, 2000.